Loyality – written 2012

LOYALITY TO TRAINER

 

One of the reasons I love working in the fitness industry is because it is a highly competitive environment that is forever changing. There is endless research being released about the best ways to train, diet, make life changes etc. and in some locations, the necessity to belong to a gym and have a trainer. So there are endless people that need your help and endless ways to do it. As a trainer, you need to be able to work with this day after day.

I totally understand that Personal Training is a massive financial commitment to make, as well as an emotional one. To be able to admit that you are not happy with your current situation and want to find solutions so you can be in you desired situation is hard and can make you feel vulnerable to be in a place that is outside your comfort zone, For many people this will be the gym. As a trainer I think it is imperative to make your client feel as comfortable as they can in this new and challenging environment, so keeping it really simple for the first session or two helps your client feel more prepared for what is to come. And you can spend this time getting to know the way they move and how they respond to your instructions and the language you use. Getting your client to hit their limits and then break through it takes a great deal of trust from both sides of this new budding relationship.

I digress slightly but it helps to make the point that building a good rapport with your clients is essential for helping them to reach their goals. They know that they need to make changes and are giving you the chance to help give them the one thing nobody can live without, their health. It takes a lot for anyone to stand up and say they are failing and they need your help, and as a trainer you should never take advantage of this.

As a trainer it is my responsibility to try and have a wide understanding about a lot of different training methods, nutrition plans and pieces of kit so that I can deliver the best possible service to my clients. It is also important to know what my own areas of weakness are and to not drift from what I know and want to deliver. I always want my clients to be honest with what they have been able to achieve on their own and any difficulties they’ve come across. I also want them to be able to ask me to change the direction of our plan or to inject new ideas.

From my experience, it is not uncommon for trainers to be greedy and think that their clients are theirs and no one else can help them. Or even worse, that they know everything there is to know and are the best trainer ever.  I disagree. I will always try to keep good relationships with other local trainers that specialise in different areas, so that I can send/refer my clients across to them.

For example, I have lots of experience with rehab and I love doing strength and conditioning programs so will always want to attract these clients and help them achieve these goals. But these are very rarely the only goals my clients want and are not all of the fundamentals of fitness so I will refer my clients out, so that they can build on other aspects such as flexibility and weight loss. In my eyes, this has nothing to do with loyalty or lack of; it is getting the best of what you can and sometimes other people have more experience than you and a different teaching method. If you truly care about your clients’ health and want to make them the best they can be, you need to give them the tools to make this happen so swallow your pride and do the best that you can with what you know and let someone else help them with the other things that you can’t deliver. If you have a solid belief in what you do, a good client trainer relationship and belief in your fellow trainers you will grow bigger than you ever thought possible, and you will get clients referred to you from other trainers and a growing reputation.

You need to give respect, to get respect and sometimes people just take you for granted but it isn’t about you as the trainer, it is all about your client.

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